(Preamble)

Understanding the social and ethical implications of a field as complex as AI will only be possible through world class scientific research and the inclusion of many voices. DeepMind Ethics & Society is governed by five Principles that seek to guarantee the rigour, transparency and social accountability of its work.
Principle: DeepMind Ethics & Society Principles, Oct 3, 2017 (unconfirmed)

Published by DeepMind

Related Principles

(e) Democracy

Key decisions on the regulation of AI development and application should be the result of democratic debate and public engagement. A spirit of global cooperation and public dialogue on the issue will ensure that they are taken in an inclusive, informed, and farsighted manner. The right to receive education or access information on new technologies and their ethical implications will facilitate that everyone understands risks and opportunities and is empowered to participate in decisional processes that crucially shape our future. The principles of human dignity and autonomy centrally involve the human right to self determination through the means of democracy. Of key importance to our democratic political systems are value pluralism, diversity and accommodation of a variety of conceptions of the good life of citizens. They must not be jeopardised, subverted or equalised by new technologies that inhibit or influence political decision making and infringe on the freedom of expression and the right to receive and impart information without interference. Digital technologies should rather be used to harness collective intelligence and support and improve the civic processes on which our democratic societies depend.

Published by European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies, European Commission in Ethical principles and democratic prerequisites, Mar 9, 2018

1. Artificial intelligence should be developed for the common good and benefit of humanity.

The UK must seek to actively shape AI's development and utilisation, or risk passively acquiescing to its many likely consequences. A shared ethical AI framework is needed to give clarity as to how AI can best be used to benefit individuals and society. By establishing these principles, the UK can lead by example in the international community. We recommend that the Government convene a global summit of governments, academia and industry to establish international norms for the design, development, regulation and deployment of artificial intelligence. The prejudices of the past must not be unwittingly built into automated systems, and such systems must be carefully designed from the beginning, with input from as diverse a group of people as possible.

Published by House of Lords, Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence in AI Code, Apr 16, 2018

Preamble

Artificial Intelligence (“AI”) research focuses on the realization of AI, which is the enabling of computers to possess intelligence and become capable of learning and acting autonomously. AI will assume a significant role in the future of mankind in a wide range of areas, such as Industry, Medicine, Education, Culture, Economics, Politics, Government, etc. However, it is undeniable that AI technologies can become detrimental to human society or conflict with public interests due to abuse or misuse. To ensure that AI research and development remains beneficial to human society, AI researchers, as highly specialized professionals, must act ethically and in accordance with their own conscience and acumen. AI researchers must listen attentively to the diverse views of society and learn from it with humility. As technology advances and society develops, AI researchers should consistently strive to develop and deepen their sense of ethics and morality independently. The Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence (JSAI) hereby formalizes the Ethical Guidelines to be applied by its members. These Ethical Guidelines shall serve as a moral foundation for JSAI members to become better aware of their social responsibilities and encourage effective communications with society. JSAI members shall undertake and comply with these guidelines.

Published by The Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence (JSAI) in The Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence Ethical Guidelines, Feb 28, 2017

PREAMBLE

For the first time in human history, it is possible to create autonomous systems capable of performing complex tasks of which natural intelligence alone was thought capable: processing large quantities of information, calculating and predicting, learning and adapting responses to changing situations, and recognizing and classifying objects. Given the immaterial nature of these tasks, and by analogy with human intelligence, we designate these wide ranging systems under the general name of artificial intelligence. Artificial intelligence constitutes a major form of scientific and technological progress, which can generate considerable social benefits by improving living conditions and health, facilitating justice, creating wealth, bolstering public safety, and mitigating the impact of human activities on the environment and the climate. Intelligent machines are not limited to performing better calculations than human beings; they can also interact with sentient beings, keep them company and take care of them. However, the development of artificial intelligence does pose major ethical challenges and social risks. Indeed, intelligent machines can restrict the choices of individuals and groups, lower living standards, disrupt the organization of labor and the job market, influence politics, clash with fundamental rights, exacerbate social and economic inequalities, and affect ecosystems, the climate and the environment. Although scientific progress, and living in a society, always carry a risk, it is up to the citizens to determine the moral and political ends that give meaning to the risks encountered in an uncertain world. The lower the risks of its deployment, the greater the benefits of artificial intelligence will be. The first danger of artificial intelligence development consists in giving the illusion that we can master the future through calculations. Reducing society to a series of numbers and ruling it through algorithmic procedures is an old pipe dream that still drives human ambitions. But when it comes to human affairs, tomorrow rarely resembles today, and numbers cannot determine what has moral value, nor what is socially desirable. The principles of the current declaration are like points on a moral compass that will help guide the development of artificial intelligence towards morally and socially desirable ends. They also offer an ethical framework that promotes internationally recognized human rights in the fields affected by the rollout of artificial intelligence. Taken as a whole, the principles articulated lay the foundation for cultivating social trust towards artificially intelligent systems. The principles of the current declaration rest on the common belief that human beings seek to grow as social beings endowed with sensations, thoughts and feelings, and strive to fulfill their potential by freely exercising their emotional, moral and intellectual capacities. It is incumbent on the various public and private stakeholders and policymakers at the local, national and international level to ensure that the development and deployment of artificial intelligence are compatible with the protection of fundamental human capacities and goals, and contribute toward their fuller realization. With this goal in mind, one must interpret the proposed principles in a coherent manner, while taking into account the specific social, cultural, political and legal contexts of their application.

Published by University of Montreal in The Montreal Declaration for a Responsible Development of Artificial Intelligence, Dec 4, 2018

(Preamble)

...To achieve these objectives, we must set out from the very beginning of each algorithm’s development with an “algor ethical” vision, i.e. an approach of ethics by design. Designing and planning AI systems that we can trust involves seeking a consensus among political decision makers, UN system agencies and other intergovernmental organisations, researchers, the world of academia and representatives of non governmental organizations regarding the ethical principles that should be built into these technologies. For this reason, the sponsors of the call express their desire to work together, in this context and at a national and international level, to promote “algor ethics”, namely the ethical use of AI as defined by the following principles:

Published by The Pontifical Academy for Life, Microsoft, IBM, FAO, the Italia Government in Rome Call for AI Ethics, Feb 28, 2020