4. All citizens have the right to be educated to enable them to flourish mentally, emotionally and economically alongside artificial intelligence.

We welcome the measures to increase the number of computer science teachers in secondary schools and we urge the Government to ensure that there is support for teachers with associated skills and subjects such as mathematics to retrain. At earlier stages of education, children need to be adequately prepared for working with, and using, AI. For all children, the basic knowledge and understanding necessary to navigate an AI driven world will be essential. AI will have significant implications for the ways in which society lives and works. AI may accelerate the digital disruption in the jobs market. Many jobs will be enhanced by AI, many will disappear and many new, as yet unknown jobs, will be created. A significant Government investment in skills and training is needed if this disruption is to be navigated successfully and to the benefit of the working population and national productivity growth.
Principle: AI Code, Apr 16, 2018

Published by House of Lords, Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence

Related Principles

· (2) Education

In a society premised on AI, we have to eliminate disparities, divisions, or socially weak people. Therefore, policy makers and managers of the enterprises involved in AI must have an accurate understanding of AI, the knowledge for proper use of AI in society and AI ethics, taking into account the complexity of AI and the possibility that AI can be misused intentionally. The AI user should understand the outline of AI and be educated to utilize it properly because AI is much more complicated than the already developed conventional tools. On the other hand, from the viewpoint of AI’s contributions to society, it is important for the developers of AI to learn about the social sciences, business models, and ethics, including normative awareness of norms and wide range of liberal arts not to mention the basis possibly generated by AI. From the above point of view, it is necessary to establish an educational environment that provides AI literacy according to the following principles, equally to every person. In order to get rid of disparity between people having a good knowledge about AI technology and those being weak in it, opportunities for education such as AI literacy are widely provided in early childhood education and primary and secondary education. The opportunities of learning about AI should be provided for the elderly people as well as workforce generation. Our society needs an education scheme by which anyone should be able to learn AI, mathematics, and data science beyond the boundaries of literature and science. Literacy education provides the following contents: 1) Data used by AI are usually contaminated by bias, 2) AI is easy to generate unwanted bias in its use, and 3) The issues of impartiality, fairness, and privacy protection which are inherent to actual use of AI. In a society in which AI is widely used, the educational environment is expected to change from the current unilateral and uniform teaching style to one that matches the interests and skill level of each individual person. Therefore, the society probably shares the view that the education system will change constantly to the above mentioned education style, regardless of the success experience in the educational system of the past. In education, it is especially important to avoid dropouts. For this, it is desirable to introduce an interactive educational environment which fully utilizes AI technologies and allows students to work together to feel a kind accomplishment. In order to develop such an educational environment, it is desirable that companies and citizens work on their own initiative, not to burden administrations and schools (teachers).

Published by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan in Social Principles of Human-centric AI (Draft), Dec 27, 2018

9. We share and enlighten.

We acknowledge the transformative power of AI for our society. We will support people and society in preparing for this future world. We live our digital responsibility by sharing our knowledge, pointing out the opportunities of the new technology without neglecting its risks. We will engage with our customers, other companies, policy makers, education institutions and all other stakeholders to ensure we understand their concerns and needs and can setup the right safeguards. We will engage in AI and ethics education. Hereby preparing ourselves, our colleagues and our fellow human beings for the new tasks ahead. Many tasks that are being executed by humans now will be automated in the future. This leads to a shift in the demand of skills. Jobs will be reshaped, rather replaced by AI. While this seems certain, the minority knows what exactly AI technology is capable of achieving. Prejudice and sciolism lead to either demonization of progress or to blind acknowledgment, both calling for educational work. We as Deutsche Telekom feel responsible to enlighten people and help society to deal with the digital shift, so that new appropriate skills can be developed and new jobs can be taken over. And we start from within – by enabling our colleagues and employees. But we are aware that this task cannot be solved by one company alone. Therefore we will engage in partnerships with other companies, offer our know how to policy makers and education providers to jointly tackle the challenges ahead.

Published by Deutsche Telekom in Deutsche Telekom’s guidelines for artificial intelligence, May 11, 2018

· 3.2 Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Education

Current and future workers need to be prepared with the necessary education and training to help them succeed. We recognize that delivering training is critical and will require significant investment, not only in STEM education, but also in understanding human behavior via the humanities and social sciences. To ensure employability of the workforce of the future, the public and private sectors should work together to design and deliver work based learning and training systems, and advance approaches that provide students with real work experiences and concrete skills. In conjunction, prioritizing diversity and inclusion in STEM fields, and in the AI community specifically, will be a key part in ensuring AI develops in the most robust way possible.

Published by Information Technology Industry Council (ITI) in AI Policy Principles, Oct 24, 2017

· 3.3 Workforce

There is concern that AI will result in job change, job loss, and or worker displacement. While these concerns are understandable, it should be noted that most emerging AI technologies are designed to perform a specific task and assist rather than replace human employees. This type of augmented intelligence means that a portion, but most likely not all, of an employee’s job could be replaced or made easier by AI. While the full impact of AI on jobs is not yet fully known, in terms of both jobs created and displaced, an ability to adapt to rapid technological change is critical. We should leverage traditional human centered resources as well as new career educational models and newly developed AI technologies to assist both the existing workforce and future workforce in successfully navigating career development and job transitions. Additionally, we must have PPPs that significantly improve the delivery and effectiveness of lifelong career education and learning, inclusive of workforce adjustment programs. We must also prioritize the availability of job driven training to meet the scale of need, targeting resources to programs that produce strong results.

Published by Information Technology Industry Council (ITI) in AI Policy Principles, Oct 24, 2017

7. Secure a Just Transition and Ensuring Support for Fundamental Freedoms and Rights

As AI systems develop and augmented realities are formed, workers and work tasks will be displaced. To ensure a just transition, as well as sustainable future developments, it is vital that corporate policies are put in place that ensure corporate accountability in relation to this displacement, such as retraining programmes and job change possibilities. Governmental measures to help displaced workers retrain and find new employment are additionally required. AI systems coupled with the wider transition to the digital economy will require that workers on all levels and in all occupations have access to social security and to continuous lifelong learning to remain employable. It is the responsibility of states and companies to find solutions that provide all workers, in all forms of work, the right to and access to both. In addition, in a world where the casualisation or individualisation of work is rising, all workers in all forms of work must have the same, strong social and fundamental rights. All AI systems must include a check and balance on whether its deployment and augmentation go hand in hand with workers’ rights as laid out in human right laws, ILO conventions and collective agreements. An algorithm “8798” reflecting the core ILO conventions 87 and 98 that is built into the system could serve that very purpose. Upon failure, the system must be shut down.

Published by UNI Global Union in Top 10 Principles For Ethical Artificial Intelligence, Dec 11, 2017