R Respect of privacy

The rise of AI has been described by some as the death of privacy, while others have compared it to an Orwellian Big Brother ready to scoop on everyone's private life. Certainly, machine learning technologies have brought about new ethical issues related to the respect of privacy. Recognising this, the European Commission reinforced the principle that everyone has the right to the protection of personal data by proposing a comprehensive reform of data protection rules (General Data Protection Regulation GDPR).
Principle: IBE interactive framework of fundamental values and principles for the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in business, Jan 11, 2018

Published by Institute of Business Ethics (IBE)

Related Principles

(h) Data protection and privacy

In an age of ubiquitous and massive collection of data through digital communication technologies, the right to protection of personal information and the right to respect for privacy are crucially challenged. Both physical AI robots as part of the Internet of Things, as well as AI softbots that operate via the World Wide Web must comply with data protection regulations and not collect and spread data or be run on sets of data for whose use and dissemination no informed consent has been given. ‘Autonomous’ systems must not interfere with the right to private life which comprises the right to be free from technologies that influence personal development and opinions, the right to establish and develop relationships with other human beings, and the right to be free from surveillance. Also in this regard, exact criteria should be defined and mechanisms established that ensure ethical development and ethically correct application of ‘autonomous’ systems. In light of concerns with regard to the implications of ‘autonomous’ systems on private life and privacy, consideration may be given to the ongoing debate about the introduction of two new rights: the right to meaningful human contact and the right to not be profiled, measured, analysed, coached or nudged.

Published by European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies, European Commission in Ethical principles and democratic prerequisites, Mar 9, 2018

· 7. Respect for Privacy

Privacy and data protection must be guaranteed at all stages of the life cycle of the AI system. This includes all data provided by the user, but also all information generated about the user over the course of his or her interactions with the AI system (e.g. outputs that the AI system generated for specific users, how users responded to particular recommendations, etc.). Digital records of human behaviour can reveal highly sensitive data, not only in terms of preferences, but also regarding sexual orientation, age, gender, religious and political views. The person in control of such information could use this to his her advantage. Organisations must be mindful of how data is used and might impact users, and ensure full compliance with the GDPR as well as other applicable regulation dealing with privacy and data protection.

Published by The European Commission’s High-Level Expert Group on Artificial Intelligence in Draft Ethics Guidelines for Trustworthy AI, Dec 18, 2018

3. Artificial intelligence should not be used to diminish the data rights or privacy of individuals, families or communities.

Many of the hopes and the fears presently associated with AI are out of step with reality. The public and policymakers alike have a responsibility to understand the capabilities and limitations of this technology as it becomes an increasing part of our daily lives. This will require an awareness of when and where this technology is being deployed. Access to large quantities of data is one of the factors fuelling the current AI boom. The ways in which data is gathered and accessed need to be reconsidered, so that innovative companies, big and small, have fair and reasonable access to data, while citizens and consumers can also protect their privacy and personal agency in this changing world. Large companies which have control over vast quantities of data must be prevented from becoming overly powerful within this landscape. We call on the Government, with the Competition and Markets Authority, to review proactively the use and potential monopolisation of data by big technology companies operating in the UK.

Published by House of Lords, Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence in AI Code, Apr 16, 2018

6. Principle of privacy

Developers should take it into consideration that AI systems will not infringe the privacy of users or third parties. [Comment] The privacy referred to in this principle includes spatial privacy (peace of personal life), information privacy (personal data), and secrecy of communications. Developers should consider international guidelines on privacy, such as “OECD Guidelines on the Protection of Privacy and Transborder Flows of Personal Data,” as well as the followings, with consideration of the possibility that AI systems might change their outputs or programs as a result of learning and other methods: ● To make efforts to evaluate the risks of privacy infringement and conduct privacy impact assessment in advance. ● To make efforts to take necessary measures, to the extent possible in light of the characteristics of the technologies to be adopted throughout the process of development of the AI systems (“privacy by design”), to avoid infringement of privacy at the time of the utilization.

Published by Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications (MIC), the Government of Japan in AI R&D Principles, Jul 28, 2017

1. Right to Transparency.

All individuals have the right to know the basis of an AI decision that concerns them. This includes access to the factors, the logic, and techniques that produced the outcome. [Explanatory Memorandum] The elements of the Transparency Principle can be found in several modern privacy laws, including the US Privacy Act, the EU Data Protection Directive, the GDPR, and the Council of Europe Convention 108. The aim of this principle is to enable independent accountability for automated decisions, with a primary emphasis on the right of the individual to know the basis of an adverse determination. In practical terms, it may not be possible for an individual to interpret the basis of a particular decision, but this does not obviate the need to ensure that such an explanation is possible.

Published by The Public Voice coalition, established by Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) in Universal Guidelines for Artificial Intelligence, Oct 23, 2018