2. AI systems deployed on behalf of government should be trained to reflect the Values and Ethics of the Public Sector as well as Canadian and international human rights obligations; they should be used to reinforce these values where possible;

Principle: Seven principles on the use of AI systems in government, Jun 28, 2018 (unconfirmed)

Published by The Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada (TBS)

Related Principles

Human centred values

Throughout their lifecycle, AI systems should respect human rights, diversity, and the autonomy of individuals. This principle aims to ensure that AI systems are aligned with human values. Machines should serve humans, and not the other way around. AI systems should enable an equitable and democratic society by respecting, protecting and promoting human rights, enabling diversity, respecting human freedom and the autonomy of individuals, and protecting the environment. Human rights risks need to be carefully considered, as AI systems can equally enable and hamper such fundamental rights. It’s permissible to interfere with certain human rights where it’s reasonable, necessary and proportionate. All people interacting with AI systems should be able to keep full and effective control over themselves. AI systems should not undermine the democratic process, and should not undertake actions that threaten individual autonomy, like deception, unfair manipulation, unjustified surveillance, and failing to maintain alignment between a disclosed purpose and true action. AI systems should be designed to augment, complement and empower human cognitive, social and cultural skills. Organisations designing, developing, deploying or operating AI systems should ideally hire staff from diverse backgrounds, cultures and disciplines to ensure a wide range of perspectives, and to minimise the risk of missing important considerations only noticeable by some stakeholders.

Published by Department of Industry, Innovation and Science, Australian Government in AI Ethics Principles, Nov 7, 2019

· (6) Fairness, Accountability, and Transparency

Under the "AI Ready society", when using AI, fair and transparent decision making and accountability for the results should be appropriately ensured, and trust in technology should be secured, in order that people using AI will not be discriminated on the ground of the person's background or treated unjustly in light of human dignity. Under the AI design concept, all people must be treated fairly without unjustified discrimination on the grounds of diverse backgrounds such as race, sex, nationality, age, political beliefs, religion, etc. Appropriate explanations should be provided such as the fact that AI is being used, the method of obtaining and using the data used in AI, and the mechanism to ensure the appropriateness of the operation results of AI according to the situation AI is used. In order for people to understand and judge AI proposals, there should be appropriate opportunities for open dialogue on the use, adoption and operation of AI, as needed. In order to ensure the above viewpoints and to utilize AI safely in society, a mechanism must be established to secure trust in AI and its using data.

Published by Cabinet Office, Government of Japan in Social Principles of Human-centric AI (Draft), Dec 27, 2018

VI. Societal and environmental well being

For AI to be trustworthy, its impact on the environment and other sentient beings should be taken into account. Ideally, all humans, including future generations, should benefit from biodiversity and a habitable environment. Sustainability and ecological responsibility of AI systems should hence be encouraged. The same applies to AI solutions addressing areas of global concern, such as for instance the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Furthermore, the impact of AI systems should be considered not only from an individual perspective, but also from the perspective of society as a whole. The use of AI systems should be given careful consideration particularly in situations relating to the democratic process, including opinion formation, political decision making or electoral contexts. Moreover, AI’s social impact should be considered. While AI systems can be used to enhance social skills, they can equally contribute to their deterioration.

Published by European Commission in Key requirements for trustworthy AI, Apr 8, 2019

1. Artificial intelligence should be developed for the common good and benefit of humanity.

The UK must seek to actively shape AI's development and utilisation, or risk passively acquiescing to its many likely consequences. A shared ethical AI framework is needed to give clarity as to how AI can best be used to benefit individuals and society. By establishing these principles, the UK can lead by example in the international community. We recommend that the Government convene a global summit of governments, academia and industry to establish international norms for the design, development, regulation and deployment of artificial intelligence. The prejudices of the past must not be unwittingly built into automated systems, and such systems must be carefully designed from the beginning, with input from as diverse a group of people as possible.

Published by House of Lords, Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence in AI Code, Apr 16, 2018

1. Principle 1 — Human Rights

Issue: How can we ensure that A IS do not infringe upon human rights? [Candidate Recommendations] To best honor human rights, society must assure the safety and security of A IS so that they are designed and operated in a way that benefits humans: 1. Governance frameworks, including standards and regulatory bodies, should be established to oversee processes assuring that the use of A IS does not infringe upon human rights, freedoms, dignity, and privacy, and of traceability to contribute to the building of public trust in A IS. 2. A way to translate existing and forthcoming legal obligations into informed policy and technical considerations is needed. Such a method should allow for differing cultural norms as well as legal and regulatory frameworks. 3. For the foreseeable future, A IS should not be granted rights and privileges equal to human rights: A IS should always be subordinate to human judgment and control.

Published by The IEEE Global Initiative on Ethics of Autonomous and Intelligent Systems in Ethically Aligned Design (v2): General Principles, (v1) Dec 13, 2016. (v2) Dec 12, 2017