Ethical Considerations in Deployment and Design

Principle: AI system designers and builders need to apply a user centric approach to the technology. They need to consider their collective responsibility in building AI systems that will not pose security risks to the Internet and Internet users. Recommendations: Adopt ethical standards: Adherence to the principles and standards of ethical considerations in the design of artificial intelligence, should guide researchers and industry going forward. Promote ethical considerations in innovation policies: Innovation policies should require adherence to ethical standards as a pre requisite for things like funding.
Principle: Guiding Principles and Recommendations, Apr 18, 2017

Published by Internet Society, "Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning: Policy Paper"

Related Principles

(c) Responsibility

The principle of responsibility must be fundamental to AI research and application. ‘Autonomous’ systems should only be developed and used in ways that serve the global social and environmental good, as determined by outcomes of deliberative democratic processes. This implies that they should be designed so that their effects align with a plurality of fundamental human values and rights. As the potential misuse of ‘autonomous’ technologies poses a major challenge, risk awareness and a precautionary approach are crucial. Applications of AI and robotics should not pose unacceptable risks of harm to human beings, and not compromise human freedom and autonomy by illegitimately and surreptitiously reducing options for and knowledge of citizens. They should be geared instead in their development and use towards augmenting access to knowledge and access to opportunities for individuals. Research, design and development of AI, robotics and ‘autonomous’ systems should be guided by an authentic concern for research ethics, social accountability of developers, and global academic cooperation to protect fundamental rights and values and aim at designing technologies that support these, and not detract from them.

Published by European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies, European Commission in Ethical principles and democratic prerequisites, Mar 9, 2018

· 1.1 Responsible Design and Deployment

We recognize our responsibility to integrate principles into the design of AI technologies, beyond compliance with existing laws. While the potential benefits to people and society are amazing, AI researchers, subject matter experts, and stakeholders should and do spend a great deal of time working to ensure the responsible design and deployment of AI systems. Highly autonomous AI systems must be designed consistent with international conventions that preserve human dignity, rights, and freedoms. As an industry, it is our responsibility to recognize potentials for use and misuse, the implications of such actions, and the responsibility and opportunity to take steps to avoid the reasonably predictable misuse of this technology by committing to ethics by design.

Published by Information Technology Industry Council (ITI) in AI Policy Principles, Oct 24, 2017

• Require Accountability for Ethical Design and Implementation

The social implications of computing have grown and will continue to expand as more people have access to implementations of AI. Public policy should work to identify and mitigate discrimination caused by the use of AI and encourage designing in protections against these harms. [Recommendations] • Standing for “Accountable Artificial Intelligence”: Governments, industry and academia should apply the Information Accountability Foundation’s principles to AI. Organizations implementing AI solutions should be able to demonstrate to regulators that they have the right processes, policies and resources in place to meet those principles. • Transparent decisions: Governments should determine which AI implementations require algorithm explainability to mitigate discrimination and harm to individuals.

Published by Intel in AI public policy principles, Oct 18, 2017

(Preamble)

New developments in Artificial Intelligence are transforming the world, from science and industry to government administration and finance. The rise of AI decision making also implicates fundamental rights of fairness, accountability, and transparency. Modern data analysis produces significant outcomes that have real life consequences for people in employment, housing, credit, commerce, and criminal sentencing. Many of these techniques are entirely opaque, leaving individuals unaware whether the decisions were accurate, fair, or even about them. We propose these Universal Guidelines to inform and improve the design and use of AI. The Guidelines are intended to maximize the benefits of AI, to minimize the risk, and to ensure the protection of human rights. These Guidelines should be incorporated into ethical standards, adopted in national law and international agreements, and built into the design of systems. We state clearly that the primary responsibility for AI systems must reside with those institutions that fund, develop, and deploy these systems.

Published by The Public Voice coalition, established by Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) in Universal Guidelines for Artificial Intelligence, Oct 23, 2018

6. Flexibility

When developing regulatory and non regulatory approaches, agencies should pursue performance based and flexible approaches that can adapt to rapid changes and updates to AI applications. Rigid, design based regulations that attempt to prescribe the technical specifications of AI applications will in most cases be impractical and ineffective, given the anticipated pace with which AI will evolve and the resulting need for agencies to react to new information and evidence. Targeted agency conformity assessment schemes, to protect health and safety, privacy, and other values, will be essential to a successful, and flexible, performance based approach. To advance American innovation, agencies should keep in mind international uses of AI, ensuring that American companies are not disadvantaged by the United States’ regulatory regime.

Published by The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), United States in Principles for the Stewardship of AI Applications, Jan 13, 2020